3 Holistic Ways to Reduce Stress and Anxiety

Friday, June 23, 2017

By: Ariana Palmieri
Do you suffer from constant stress or feel anxious all the time? I know the feeling. Sometimes, I have a lot of weight on my shoulders too. There are times where I want to accomplish a dozen different things all at once and feel that I'm slacking. That's when my anxiety starts kicking in and I wonder if I'll ever get to them. It makes me want to pull my hair out (but I don't, so no worries). What about you? What stresses you out? Maybe it's your job, or drama with family or friends. Whatever your story is, I get it. Stress and anxiety suck, but it happens to the best of us.
While I can't say I know how to completely get rid of stress and anxiety, I do know what helps me. Today I'm going to share my tips and tricks with you greenifiers in hopes this will ease your woes just a little bit. While these five holistic ways to de-stress and calm anxiety work for me, they might not work for you, and that's okay. If any of them are new to you, maybe try one out to see if it helps (you might be surprised!). Is there a specific way you like to reduce stress and anxiety? Feel free to share it in the comments below!
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Aromatherapy
Whenever I'm starting to freak out over something, the first thing I usually go for is something that smells good. And by smells good, I mean floral waters, essential oils, and smudge sprays. I find that inhaling a whiff of rosewater, lavender essential oil, or sage smudge spray really helps to re-center me and relax me. But one of my absolute favorite aromatherapy products is my lavender rose reiki infused crystal aura spray (the dark blue glass bottle pictured above). I got it from a brand called Awaken the Light. It smells absolutely divine and I love to spritz it over my head or around my room when I'm feeling extra stressed out. I always reach for this first. I wish I could link to it, but unfortunately the creator of this spray doesn't seem to sell it online anymore (I got it at one of her events). She does sell really gorgeous crystal jewelry though, so feel free to give that a look.
My second go-to for aromatherapy would have to be my rosewater spray bottle. I bought it a while ago at my local health food store. It's at the end of its life, but I've actually had it for about two years. I use it sparingly and only need one to two pumps of it for it to take effect. The scent is absolutely gorgeous and actually has a few more benefits than just calming me down - it also helps set my makeup! If you're interested in learning more about floral waters (and creating your own rosewater), check out an article I wrote about them here.
I also really love my glass roll-on lavender essential oil. I like to roll it onto my wrists and just inhale the soothing aroma. I got this at a local boardwalk event (there was a booth set up for just essential oils alone) last summer and it's still full! I like to apply this at night if I'm having trouble sleeping, as the scent really helps calm me down. I used to have a little sachet with dried lavender buds too, but it ripped. I used to keep it under my pillow and smell it whenever my mind wouldn't let up. Totally recommend it.
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Relaxing Tea
At the end of the day, I absolutely love to drink chamomile or lavender tea. It really, really helps calm me down. In fact, it even helps me sleep. I like to buy from brands that have compostable tea bags, or I buy the loose herbs in bulk. Either way, I highly recommend trying this out. I prefer chamomile whenever I'm trying to go to sleep but can't due to anxiety. Lavender is better at reducing stress during the day.
There are other teas that are very good for sleeping as well, if you're interested. Sometimes, stress and anxiety can lead to insomnia, or at least keep you awake longer than you'd like to be. If you're really having trouble sleeping, I recommend this tea. It made me so drowsy after just a few minutes. That's because it's loaded with herbs that are known for their sleepy-time effects, such as ashwagandha, passionflower, skullcap, kalea sacatechichi, tulsi, and kava kava. You'll get a great night sleep with that, trust me.
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Crystals
One thing I love above all my possessions is my crystal collection. While it's not absolutely huge, it is nice. Each crystal I own has a back story to it (and no, I won't get into each). Some were given to my by a friend, some I bought myself, and some came in subscription boxes. But each is special to me and has healing properties I cannot get enough of.
Are you wondering how these pretty gems help reduce my stress and anxiety? I'm glad you asked. Sometimes, simply looking at them is enough for me. It takes me to another place, makes me think about the beauty of this earth. After all, they were formed by our earth (and I cannot help but be in awe of that). Other times, I just like to fiddle with them in my hands (especially my rose quartz sphere). Out of all of them, I absolutely adore rose quartz the most. I love pink, but I also love the wonderful energy rose quartz gives off. It's so sweet and healing (plus it helps with self-love - something you don't feel very much while stressed or anxious).
If you're feeling particularly stressed and would like to give crystals a try, I highly recommend getting some rose quartz, amethyst, aventurine, and green moss agate. All these crystals are great for calming anxiety and reducing stress levels. I particularly like them tumbled and in clusters, but tumbled crystals are easier to carry around in your pocket or purse. They can also be made into jewelry. I like to wear my crystals in a wire-wrapped necklace (which allows me to swap out crystals whenever I feel I need a new one). Plus it makes a really cute accessory! 
Do you practice any of these holistic ways to treat anxiety and stress? Let me know in the comments below!

Zero Waste Lifestyle: How I Compost in My Apartment

Friday, June 16, 2017

By: Ariana Palmieri
Recently, I've been really into reducing my food waste. Did you know Americans throw away nearly half their food every year, waste worth roughly $165 billion annually? That's insane, and I don't want to be a part of that anymore. So, I decided to invest in a compost pail. I'm super happy I did too! I recently got it (on sale) from Earth Easy and couldn't be happier with it. It's made out of stainless steel, has a convenient handle, and is small enough to fit on my countertop. Don't be fooled though: It can hold up to 1 gallon of food scraps in it! Both my parents (who don't consider themselves zero wasters, mind you) have already started using it. They don't mind it at all. Why? Because it has a built-in charcoal filter which will last 6 months and prevent nasty odors. I haven't smelled a thing since buying and using it (unless I open it up to put in more food scraps). Tomorrow (and every Saturday after that) I intend to bring it to my local farmer's market. They collect food scraps there and turn it into compost. Since I live in an apartment, and I know my parents would not be up for having a full-on compost bin (complete with worms and all), this is the easiest solution. The most important part is that I've cut most of my waste down already just by having this one handy device in my home. Want one of these in your casa? Here's how I compost at home and how you can too.
 
 
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How I compost at home
 

Technically, I don't actually compost at home. I bring my decomposables to the farmers market, where it will get turned into compost. That said, if you live in an apartment too, the compost pail I use will surely come in handy. It will make composting so easy and reduce your food waste to pretty much zero. It's valued at $39.99, but I got it on sale for $29.95 (it should still be on sale too!). It also comes with replacement filters and already had a filter in it when I unboxed it. I also ordered one extra set of filters (so now I have 3 filters - which totals in 18 months - 1 year and 6 months - of coverage!). The filters are super cheap to replace too ($5.95 to be exact) and will make sure you smell absolutely nothing.

  

Also, if you prefer something a little more pretty, these compost pails are available in ceramic as well. One is plain white and one is decorative with cute flowers and butterflies on it (though I believe this one is smaller in size - its capacity is 3/4 a gallon, compared to the others which fit 1 whole gallon). If, for some reason, you really cannot afford this pail, then you can also store your food scraps in a sealable container of any kind and keep it in the fridge/freezer. This will help prevent odors and is what I did before I got my compost pail (I reused an old plastic Chinese food container). Now without further ado, here's how you can compost at home:

  • The easiest way to compost at home is to just take your food scraps to a farmers market. Almost every farmers market will have someone there more than willing to take the scraps off your hands and compost it for you. At mine, there's a booth set up especially for it, and the man who runs it is super grateful to anyone who contributes to his compost pile. This is the method I use. Just visit your local farmers market and ask if they have somewhere to donate food scraps (and other decomposable items which you can collect, like paper, cardboard, hair, etc. - all mentioned in 'what to compost')!
  • Some farmers markets may also give you compost in exchange for your food scraps (and other decomposables). You might not have a need for this if you live in an apartment, so it's completely up to you if you want to take the compost. It makes really great fertilizer for any houseplants though!
  • I really recommend bringing a wooden spoon with you and a reusable bag. The wooden spoon will help you scrape out any remaining scraps that might cling to the pail without getting your hands dirty. I use the reusable bag to shop around as well as carry my compost pail conveniently. While it does have a handle, it can get a little tedious carrying that around when you also want to shop at the farmers market!

 
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What to compost:
Now that we discussed how I compost, lets talk about what I compost (or can compost). Not everything on this list goes into my pail (simply because I live in an apartment, not a house), but I felt it was important to include everything you can compost in general.
 
  • Fruit and vegetable scraps (ex: the ends of carrots, potato peels, strawberry crowns, banana peels, etc.)
  • Hair and fur (yes, it's biodegradable! I take any hair that clumps up in my brush and put it in my pail)
  • Coffee grounds (I don't drink coffee but my folks do!)
  • Tea leaves or tea bags (I always make sure I buy tea bags that say they're compostable - some are made using plastic!)
  • Egg shells (I wash them out gently with water before I add these in)
  • Nuts and seeds (pits of fruit, for example)
  • Yard waste (leaves, twigs, grass clippings etc. Since I live in an apartment, this doesn't apply to me - plus I don't think it would all fit in the pail anyway. That said, it is biodegradable)
  • Houseplants or wilted flowers in vases (I'll probably just add my houseplants to my compost pail when they die - instead of throwing them in the trash!).
  • Fireplace ashes (I don't have a fire place, but still, biodegradable)
  • Sawdust and woodchips (I'll probably never have to put this in there, but yeah)
  • Cardboard, paper, shredded newspaper (just make sure they're not coated in plastic!)
  • Hay and straw (Again, not something I'll ever need to worry about, but felt it important to include)
  • Cotton and wool rags (at the end of my cotton facial wipes, I'll definitely be composting them!)
  • Any 100% natural material/fabric (like my bamboo toothbrush - I will compost that too)
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What not to compost:
Literally, these are things I will never put in my compost pail, even if I do have access to them. And you shouldn't either.
  • Dairy products (like yogurt, butter, milk, sour cream, eggs, etc.)
  • Meat or fish (bones and scraps included)
  • Pet waste (like feces)
  • Yard trimmings treated with pesticides (these might kill beneficial composting organisms!)
  • Disposable feminine products (if you're still using these btw, consider switching to cloth pads!)
  • Disposable diapers (consider switching over to cloth diapers for your baby)
  • Fats, grease, lard, or oils
  • Diseased or insect ridden plants
  • Plastic lined cartons (or plastic anything for that matter)
  • Coal or charcoal ash (might contain substances harmful to plants. Bamboo charcoal - like the one I use to filter my water - is okay to compost though!)
  • Black walnut tree leaves or twigs (apparently this plant releases substances that may harm other plants)
 
 
Yes, it's really that simple! I hope this helped some of you and inspired you to start composting in your home. Just remember, every little bit you do for the planet helps! Leave a comment below and let me know how you like to compost at home!


How to Make Zero Waste Iced Tea (+ 3 Healthy Recipes)

Friday, June 9, 2017

By: Ariana Palmieri
In honor of National Iced Tea Day, which is Saturday, June 10th, I decided to share with you an easy, completely zero waste way to make iced tea (3 ways in fact). I am a tea fanatic, so when I learned about this holiday I got really excited and wanted to give it a zero waste spin that would make all you tea lovers grin from ear to ear. It actually pretty darn simple to do at home and doesn't require too many expensive materials or tools, which is great. I really hope you enjoy it, and if you do, be sure to tell me what your favorite iced teas are in the comment section below!

 
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How to Make Zero Waste Iced Tea
The Basics
 
So, I'd like to first start out saying, you really don't need much to make zero waste iced tea. It's quite similar to making regular tea. The only difference is that you are limiting the amount of waste and plastic you create with every sip. Here are the basic tools (and tips) you will need to make any of the recipes listed below:
 
  • A teapot of any sort (if you don't have one, a big pot to boil water in will do)
  • A tea diffuser (if using loose tea at any point)
  • Compostable tea bags (some of the recipes below call for loose tea or tea bags - if you choose to use tea bags, make sure they are compostable. Some tea bags are made from plastic, so you have to do your research. It usually tells you on the box if it is compostable or not. For example, two tea brands that do make compostable tea bags are Yogi Tea and Traditional Medicinal. When all else fails, just get some loose leaf tea from bulk stores or places like Mountain Rose Herbs). 
  • A glass, ceramic or stainless steel pitcher of some sort
  • Glass, ceramic, or stainless steel serving cups (mason jars work well!)
  • Compost (whatever form of compost you use at home - make sure you add any tea bags, loose leaves, or fruits you use via the recipes below to it! I recently started at-home composting this week and keep my food scraps in a container. I plan to deliver them to the farmers market this Saturday, since I live in an apartment and don't have any room to make a huge compost pile of my own. Maybe I'll write a blog post about it soon...)
 
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Mint Peach Iced Tea
Now comes the really fun part: Making the recipes! Once you've got all your tools assembled, making this will be a breeze. This tea is absolutely delicious and perfect for a warm spring/summer day. Great to take on a picnic too!
 
Ingredients:
  • 8 cups of water
  • 5 ripe peaches (preferably organic - wash before use!)
  • 1 bunch of fresh mint
  • Natural sweetener (optional - this could be organic sugar, honey, agave, etc.)
  • 5 white tea bags (or 1/2 cup of loose leaf white tea)
 
Directions:
  1. First, add 8 cups of water to your tea pot, or a big stove pot. Set it on high until it boils. As soon as it starts to boil, add the 5 white tea bags, or loose leaf white tea. If you're adding loose leaf white tea, use a diffuser of some sort (you may need several individual diffusers or perhaps you have a teapot that comes with a built-in diffuser. Whatever the case, it'll make your life easier). Let it steep for about 5 to 10 minutes, depending on how strong you like your tea, then remove bags or diffusers. Be sure to add them to your compost!
  2. Now, let the tea cool down. While it sits in the pot, prepare the peaches. Cut them in half, take out the pit, and then dice up the peach. You don't have to waste the pit either - here are a few creative ways to reuse the pits (you can also add them to your compost pile too). Do this for all 5 of the peaches. Add them to the glass pitcher, along with the fresh mint leaves. I'm in the process of growing my own mint leaves (they're still babies), but you can find fresh mint at almost any grocery store.
  3. After the peaches and mint have been added to the pitcher, pour in the white tea you made in your teapot (or pot stove). You can also add as much of the natural sweetener of your choice as you want at this point. To keep things healthy, try limiting the amount you add - trust me when I say the peaches will sweeten the tea naturally. I usually don't add any natural sweeteners to my tea, but it's totally up to you.
  4. You're definitely to want to let it sit for a while, so the tea can infuse with the peach and mint flavors. Let it sit for at least 10 minutes. You can place it in the fridge and let it sit that way (so it cools down even faster), or pour some into a cup filled with ice at the end of the 10 minutes. Feel free to add some ice to the actual pitcher too. I personally recommend letting it sit in the fridge for a good 30 minutes to an hour before you try drinking it, so it gets really nice and cool. Serve in a mason jar (or plastic-free cup of your choice), and enjoy!
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Lemon Iced Tea
A true classic, this tea is something anyone will love. Well, anyone expect one of my friends who absolutely hates lemons (she only drinks water anyway). Regardless, it is the ultimate summery drink, without being lemonade (because yes, there is a difference).
 
 
Ingredients:
  • 8 cups of water
  • 5 lemons (preferably organic - wash before use!)
  • 5 green, white, or black tea bags ( depends on preference. I recommend green tea for this one. You can also choose to use 1/2 cup of loose leaf tea of any sort)
  • Natural sweetener (optional - this could be organic sugar, honey, agave, etc.)
 
Directions:
  1. First, add 8 cups of water to your tea pot, or a big stove pot. Set it on high until it boils. As soon as it starts to boil, add the 5 white, green, or black tea bags, or loose leaf tea of your choice. If you're adding loose leaf (of any kind) tea, use a diffuser of some sort (you may need several individual diffusers or perhaps you have a teapot that comes with a built-in diffuser. Whatever the case, it'll make your life easier). Let it steep for about 5 to 10 minutes, depending on how strong you like your tea, then remove bags or diffusers. Be sure to add them to your compost!
  2. Now, let the tea cool down. While it sits in the pot, prepare the lemons. Cut the lemons into slices and place the seeds on the side. You can either replant them or add them to your compost pile. Do this for all 5 of the lemons. Add them to the glass pitcher.
  3. After the lemons have been added to the pitcher, pour in the white, green, or black tea you made in your teapot (or pot stove). You can also add as much of the natural sweetener of your choice as you want at this point. To keep things healthy, try limiting the amount you add. 3 tablespoons of honey, agave, or organic sugar is usually more than enough for me. Make sure to mix it in if you do add it!
  4. You're definitely to want to let it sit for a while, so the tea can infuse with the lemon flavor. Let it sit for at least 10 minutes, or longer for more potent results. You can place it in the fridge and let it sit that way (so it cools down even faster), or pour some into a cup filled with ice at the end of the 10 minutes. Feel free to add some ice to the actual pitcher too. I personally recommend letting the pitcher sit in the fridge for a good 30 minutes to an hour before you try drinking it, so it gets really nice and cool. Serve in a mason jar (or plastic-free cup of your choice), and enjoy!
 
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 Rose Oolong Iced Tea
Now this is an interesting mix. Certainly not a 'traditional' iced tea, but I figured it would be fun to spice things up just a little bit. I had this once in a tea shop in the city and it absolutely blew me away. It's so refreshing!  
 
 
Ingredients:
  • 8 cups of water
  • 1 cup of  dried rose buds or petals (best with rose buds)  
  • 5 oolong tea bags (You can also choose to use 1/2 cup of loose leaf oolong tea)
  • Natural sweetener (optional - this could be organic sugar, honey, agave, etc.)
 
Directions:
  1. First, add 8 cups of water to your tea pot, or a big stove pot. Set it on high until it boils. As soon as it starts to boil, add the 5 oolong tea bags, or loose leaf oolong tea. Also add the dried rose buds (I always get mine from Mountain Rose Herbs, because I know they're safe for tea). If you're using loose leaf oolong tea, you can mix it with the rose buds and add it to a diffuser. If not, add the oolong tea bags, then place the rose buds into a diffuser. You may need several individual diffusers or perhaps you have a teapot that comes with a built-in diffuser. Let it steep for about 10 minutes, depending on how strong you like your tea, then remove bags or diffusers. Be sure to add them to your compost (both the oolong and the rose buds)! If you would like, you can leave a few rosebuds in the actual brewed tea for look.
  2. Now, pour the tea you made in your teapot (or pot stove) into your pitcher. Add some ice cubes and as much of the natural sweetener of your choice as you want. To keep things healthy, try limiting the amount you add. 3 tablespoons of honey, agave, or organic sugar is usually more than enough for me. Make sure to mix it in if you do add any sweeteners!
  3. Let it sit in the fridge for at least 30 minutes to an hour so it gets nice and cold. If you're really eager, feel free to pour some into a cup right away (just make sure the cup is filled with ice). Either way, enjoy!

Zero Waste Lifestyle: 20 Ways to Have a Zero Waste Bathroom

Friday, June 2, 2017

By: Ariana Palmieri
Ever since I've learned about the zero waste movement, I've become obsessed with finding more and more ways to reduce my trash. It's been hard: I don't have my own place, so I can't exactly change everything in my home. I live with my parents, so I don't exactly have control over what they buy or use. That said, I do have control over what I buy and bring into the house. I've been doing my best to introduce some zero waste friendly ideas to them, and will continue to do so. I notice that if I ease into transitions, they become easier to handle (especially when you have a roommates or relatives in the house). So, here are a few ways you can make your bathroom more eco-friendly. You can choose to tackle them at your own pace. Perhaps you incorporate one new zero waste item into your bathroom every month, or you choose 5 you want ASAP. The choice is yours, simply let this be a helpful guide. I'll be doing more of these guides in the future, so stick around! I really want to cover a bunch of different areas of the home and life, such as being zero waste on the go and having a zero waste kitchen. Already zero waste in the bathroom? Leave some of your own tips and tricks in the comment section below.

 
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  1. Make your own super basic hand soap (it's ridiculously easy!): All you need is 3/4 cup liquid castile soap, 2 1/2 cups of water, and a mason jar with a reusable metal dispenser. Or, use a pretty refillable soap dispenser you can find at places that sell bath supplies (like Bed Bath and Beyond).
  2. Instead of using paper towels (or in my case, toilet paper) to dry your face, try cloth wipes. I really recommend investing in organic cotton wipes (like these), simply because regular cotton uses 20% of the worlds pesticides and herbicides. These organic cotton wipes come in a 4 pack and the packaging is 100% post-consumer recycled paper. They're really great for wiping your face after cleaning it with your favorite cleanser. Just make sure you wash them once a week (I just fill the sink up with water and my favorite zero waste detergent from The Simply Co.) and they'll be good as new!
  3. Likewise, swap out cotton balls with these reusable makeup removal pads. Made with hemp and organic cotton, they can be washed and used over and over again. No more cotton balls to the landfill with these guys around!
  4. To take off your makeup, try using coconut oil (or olive oil). Just put some on your reusable makeup removal pads and use as you would a cotton ball.
  5. Your bathroom sink can be used for more than just washing your hands: Use it to wash other items too, like cloth wipes, feminine pads, or cotton wipes. As stated previously, I love using The Simply Co. detergent: It's zero waste, all-natural, and totally sink-friendly!
  6. Swap out dental floss for a zero waste option: Dental Lace. This is essentially refillable dental floss made from 100% mulberry silk (which is completely biodegradable, unlike it's plastic counterpart). It comes in its own refillable glass jar with two spools of floss ( that's 50 yards / 45 m). Pretty cool huh? You can also choose which colored jar you want - berry blue (blue), granite (grey), or sea rose (pink). Naturally, I'd go with sea rose, as I adore pink - and roses. And, if you run out, they also have refills available at a lower price. So cool.
  7. Try cutting down on the amount of time you spend to shower: This will help reduce water consumption! Also, did you know it takes more energy to heat water than to use cold water? Consider utilizing cold water more often (and even letting the water run cold in the shower too!). Cold water is actually great at keeping your hair shinier and reducing breakouts, so it's worth a shot.
  8. I really recommend switching to a bamboo toothbrush. You can read my review of Lifestyle Bamboo's toothbrush here to see why. Or, find out for yourself by purchasing your own. I've heard great things about Brush with Bamboo's toothbrush: Every part of it is plant-based and the handle can be composted after use!
  9. To compliment your new sustainable toothbrush, make your own toothpaste (here's a DIY I'm currently loving). Or, if you prefer, you can buy a zero waste toothpaste.
  10. Ditch the disposable razors and try a reusable, metal one instead. Sure, it's a little costly, but it saves you money in the long run. All you'll need to do is change the razor heads periodically. To avoid changing them too often, try to shave less frequently (if you can).
  11. Try rubbing some olive oil or coconut oil on your legs and armpits before shaving. This eliminates the need for wasteful, unnatural shaving gels and helps prevent cuts while hydrating your skin.
  12. Use a bamboo hairbrush instead of a plastic one. Here's the one I currently use - Wet Brush Bamboo Detangler Hair Brush. I've been using it for the past 4+ years! It works like a charm, despite the fact the soft tips at the top have long-since fallen off.
  13. Don't toss your loose hairs in the trash or down the toilet! Hair is biodegradable, so you can add it to compost, or simply toss it outside. So the next time you go to clean off that hair brush, think about that.
  14. Instead of buying a plastic shower curtain (which isn't recyclable in NYC, mind you), try investing in a cloth shower curtain. You can just wash it once it starts to become funky, and honestly, it'll save you money in the long run. Here's one I'm going to try to convince my mom to get: A sand colored hemp shower curtain. Or maybe I'll just buy it for her one day - what a nice surprise that would be! Life Without Plastic sells a few of these in different colors (natural, seafoam blue, and lime green), but I think my mom might like the neutral color of sand best. It works solo and doesn't need a liner, drying within hours. Just toss it in the washing machine every few weeks to keep it nice and clean. Totally beats the PVC ones (and I'm sure it doesn't smell as gross either)!
  15. Use package-free, all-natural body soap (which you can find at a local health food store). Or, invest in all-natural soap that comes in recyclable/compostable packaging.
  16. Buy ecofriendly toilet paper that's packaged in paper, not plastic. Also, the toilet paper itself should be recycled paper, or made from sustainable materials, like bamboo. Here's a brand I recommend (Seventh Generation). It's made from 100% unbleached recycled paper without any dyes, inks, or fragrances. Lauren Singer, the owner of the blog Trash is for Tossers, also recommends this brand!
  17. Instead of using shampoo and conditioner that come packaged in plastic, you could try shampoo bars. If that doesn't work, you could also make your own DIY shampoo and conditioner. Just store them in mason jars and keep them somewhere in your shower you can easily access. To make your life easier, invest in a metal mason jar dispenser for both jars (and don't forget to label which is which!).
  18. If you're a woman, consider making the switch to reusable cloth pads. I did and I don't miss disposables at all (check out my experience with cloth pads to see why). These are so much more healthy for you compared to disposables (and better for the environment). Or, if you're more of a tampon sort of girl, try a silicone menstrual cup.
  19. Never use harsh chemicals in your bathroom. Almost everything can be cleaned using all-natural methods. Good old fashioned lemon, salt, and essential oils can help you in just about any tough situation. When in doubt, lemon, vinegar, and baking soda make a great all-purpose cleaner!
  20. Make your own deodorant, or buy an all-natural, zero waste one. There are so many options available online, but one zero waste deodorant I've been wanting to try is Hoda’s Herbals Healing Lavender Deodorant. It's available on Life without Plastic and is made with only five simple ingredients: Shea butter, coconut oil, baking soda (sodium bicarbonate), castor oil, essential oils (lavender, cedarwood, bergamot, patchouli). Sounds good to me!

Indoor Container Gardening: 3 Fruits to Grow This Spring

Friday, May 26, 2017

By: Ariana Palmieri
Ever since I was little I've loved getting my hands dirty in soil (and sometimes even mud). There was a tree in a playground near my house that I particularly loved playing under. I would take some water, pour it into the soil, take a stick, mix it around, and make mud. My dad would watch me amusedly as I repeated over and over again, "muuuuud". Nowadays, my love for all things soil and plant-related still thrives, but has been transferred over to containers. That's because I live in an apartment and don't have much room to grow things (especially not outside). I only have two windowsills (one of them is in my parents room!) that provide adequate light. But that's okay, because I make it work, and you can too!
That's why I created this indoor container gardening series: For people who don't have access to balconies or yards! Even in books and articles on container gardening I'll see the reference to "putting your plants outdoors" or "transferring plants outside" at some point. Not here! This series is specifically designed to talk about plants that will flourish indoors in a container and stay there. Welcome to part three: Spring fruits.
My first post in this series was about spring herbs. If you'd like to see the first article in this series, I got you covered. My second post was all about spring vegetables. This time around, I'm going to be talking about spring fruits. Specifically strawberries, cherries, and lemons. These all grow great in containers (assuming you have the right sized container for the job), and I really want to encourage everyone to get their hands in the soil (even if you don't have a backyard).
Just so you know, I'll be publishing more posts in this series once a month now through August. Next month will feature summer herbs, just a heads up! More than likely, expect these posts towards the end of the month. I publish every Friday, so be sure to look for the next one around June 30th!

 
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Strawberries

 
Perhaps the easiest of the fruits listed on this post to grow in a container, strawberries are my favorite. They taste so delicious in the spring (especially when you buy organic ones), it's like heaven for your mouth. These delicious little fruits can be added to everything from salad to desserts. They can of course be eaten raw, but I love making them into a delicious jam or decadent strawberry syrup. I've never grown them before, but I'm going to be this spring/summer and I'm super excited to give it a shot!
 
You will need:
  • Strawberry seeds (preferably organic)
  • 10 - 12 inch clay pot (and 8 inches deep) with drainage hole
  • Organic potting soil (I got mine at Home Depot)
  • A dish, saucer, or tray to place under pot (to capture any water leaked out of drainage hole)
  • Sunny window (South, west, or east facing windows are best)
 
Directions:
  1. Fill your 10 - 12 inch clay pot with your organic potting soil.  If you cannot find a pot this big, it's okay to use a smaller one, but please note the smaller the pot, the more you will have to water your plant to prevent it from drying out.
  2. Now add some seeds to your soil. I recommend no more than 2 seeds per pot. Give them their space too: Seeds should be at least 5 - 6 inches apart.
  3. Now cover the seeds with some more soil, about 1/2 inch deep (in other words, don't bury them). Transfer the pot over to your chosen windowsill. Over the next few days, water by gently misting the soil, instead of with a watering can. Personally, I don't even use a watering can: I use an upcycled glass bottle. It's easier to water plants this way because there aren't several watering holes (just one) so I have better control over my watering.
  4. Watering: Once you start to see sprouts, now you can use your watering can (or for me, my upcycled glass bottle - which I painted and made look all pretty by the way). Make sure you water around the sprouts, not on them (sprouts are very fragile and you don't want them bending in awkward ways!). Water ONLY when the soil at the top is dry to the touch. Strawberries in containers need more water than in a garden, so make sure to water frequently (even daily)!
  5. Sunlight: Strawberries need 6 to 8 hours of sunlight. Essentially, that means don't even bother moving them away from the windowsill. If you see them reaching for the sunlight, rotate the pot to make sure they're getting sunlight evenly on all sides.
  6. Harvesting: To harvest strawberries, look for ones that are fully red and ripe. Don't pull on the berry: Instead, snap or cut the stem directly above the berry. Keep harvested berries in a cool place (like a refrigerator). You can also freeze them if you'd like to use them in the future, rather than right away.

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Cherries
 

 
When I was little, I ate cherries by the ton load. I would always look forward to my parents bringing home a bunch full of cherries from the store. I thought it was fun to eat because you had to remove the pits. I kind of made it into a game. I also loved how the dark red ones would stain my fingers red. I would pretend it was blood and that I was a vampire and smear it all over my lips. That, or I'd pretend I'd be applying makeup. Either way, cherries are delicious raw and make a great spring and summer treat. They also taste amazing when baked into delightful goodies. How do you like to eat your cherries? 
 

You will need:
  • Cherry seeds (you could probably just clean off the pits from cherries you buy at the store and use those - I would use organic ones though)
  • For just sprouting the seeds, a 5 - 6 inch clay pot with a drainage hole will do (once it matures, you will need to transplant it to a pot that's at least 10 - 16 inches deep and 12 - 18 inches in diameter - remember, it's a tree!)
  • Organic potting soil (I got mine at Home Depot)
  • A dish, saucer, or tray to place under pot (to capture any water leaked out of drainage hole)
  • Sunny window (South, west, or east facing windows are best)
 Directions:
  1. Pre-moisten your potting organic potting soil. Put some soil into a bucket and mix in some water until the soil is damp all the way through.
  2. Fill your 5 - 6 inch clay pot with your dampened organic potting soil. Leave about an inch of space below the rim of your container.
  3. I would suggest planting only one seed per container, so if you'd like, plant multiple seeds in different containers and see which flourish. I wouldn't recommend trying more than 4 seeds at a time.
  4. Now cover the seeds with some more soil, about 1/2 inch deep (in other words, don't bury them). Transfer the pot over to your chosen windowsill. Over the next few days, water by gently misting the soil, instead of with a watering can. Don't let the soil dry out completely - the seeds need to be warm and moist in order to germinate!
  5. Watering: You should start to see sprouts anywhere from 2 to 6 weeks or so: Now you can use your watering can (or for me, my upcycled glass bottle). Make sure you water around the sprouts, not on them (sprouts are very fragile and you don't want them bending in awkward ways!). Water whenever the soil becomes dry on the top.
  6. Transplanting: When the time comes, you will have to transplant your sprouts into a pot that's 10 - 16 inches deep and 12 - 18 inches in diameter. This will ensure it has plenty of room to grow and (eventually) produce fruit. Place more organic pre-moistened soil into the bigger pot and gently remove your sprouts from their original pot. Place them in the center of their new home and make sure they're nice and snug by adding more soil (or compacting the soil already there with your fingers).
  7. Sunlight: Cherries need at least 6 - 8 hours of sunlight a day. Essentially, that means they need to be by the windowsill at all times.
  8. Harvesting: With proper care and time, your cherry tree will fruit. Depending on the type of cherry you decide to grow, you'll know it's ripe by it's color. For example, red cherries will be almost black when ready to be picked. Pull the fruit from the tree with an inch of stem remaining. This helps the cherries remain fresh for longer periods. Freshly harvested cherries will remain good for about a week after picking. Store in a cool place (like your refrigerator!)

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Lemons


 
It's always been a dream of mine to grow a lemon tree. I want at least two of them planted outside my future home. Believe it or not, I have a connection to lemons that extends into my blood line: My grandpa actually used to own a lemon farm back in Italy. I don't know if he still has it anymore (he lives in America now and has been here for several years), but I think that's really cool. I'd love to grow lemons in a garden one day, just like he did, but for now, maybe I'll give a miniature (dwarf) lemon tree a shot. After all, these are the ones that will do best in an indoor container garden.
 
You will need:
  • Miniature lemon seeds (here are some that got good reviews on Etsy)
  • For just sprouting the seeds, a 5 - 6 inch clay pot with drainage hole will do (once it matures, you will need to transplant it to a pot that's 10 - 16 inches deep and 12 - 18 inches in diameter).
  • Organic potting soil (I got mine at Home Depot)
  • A dish, saucer, or tray to place under pot (to capture any water leaked out of drainage hole)
  • Sunny window (South, west, or east facing windows are best)
 
Directions:
  1. Pre-moisten your potting organic potting soil. Put some soil into a bucket and mix in some water until the soil is damp all the way through.
  2. Fill your 5 - 6 inch clay pot with your  dampened organic potting soil. Leave about an inch of space below the rim of your container.
  3. I would suggest planting only one seed per container, so if you'd like, plant multiple seeds in different containers and see which flourish. I wouldn't recommend trying more than 4 seeds at a time.
  4. Now cover the seeds with some more soil, about 1/2 inch deep (in other words, don't bury them). Transfer the pot over to your chosen windowsill. Over the next few days, water by gently misting the soil, instead of with a watering can.   Don't let the soil dry out completely - the seeds need to be warm and moist in order to germinate!
  5. Watering: You should start to see sprouts in about 2 weeks or so: Now you can use your watering can (or for me, my upcycled glass bottle). Make sure you water around the sprouts, not on them (sprouts are very fragile and you don't want them bending in awkward ways!). Lemons need a lot of water, so make sure to water daily.
  6. Food: Once or twice a year it might be smart to give your tree some fertilizer to help it grow. You can do this without artificial chemicals. Simply dig a little trench around the base of your tree, fill it with compost and water it well. Or, serve it up as compost tea.
  7. Transplanting: When the time comes, you will have to transplant your sprouts into a pot that's 10-16 inches deep and 12-18 inches in diameter. This will ensure it has plenty of room to grow and (eventually) produce fruit (which can take up to a year mind you). Place more organic pre-moistened soil into the bigger pot and gently remove your sprouts from their original pot. Place them in the center of their new home and make sure they're nice and snug by adding more soil (or compacting the soil already there with your fingers).
  8. Sunlight: Lemons need a lot of sunlight: 8 - 12 hours of sunlight to be exact. Essentially, that means they need to be by the windowsill at all times. If you feel your window doesn't get this much light, try investing in some cheap grow lights. 
  9. Harvesting: You won't be harvesting lemons too soon with these plants. That said, with proper care and time, they'll fruit. When they do, simply pick the lemons off like you would an apple from a tree. Feel free to snip them off right where the stem meets the lemon too (as this is gentler).

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Want more indoor container gardening? Check out the rest of the series here (this list will be updated):
 
Part 4 - Coming soon! *Summer herbs*
Part 5 - Coming soon! *Summer vegetables*
Part 6 - Coming soon! *Summer fruits*
 
I'll update this series once a month on a Friday. Next month's will probably be on June 30th. See you then! 
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